A Tailored Intervention Program for Overweight and Obese Vetrans: Who Benefits and When

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/317651
Title:
A Tailored Intervention Program for Overweight and Obese Vetrans: Who Benefits and When
Authors:
Garvin, Jane ( 0000-0001-6023-3269 )
Abstract:
This descriptive, exploratory study examined longitudinal clinical data for variables associated with weight reduction among veterans enrolled in a weight reduction intervention, the MOVE! Program. Variables of interest included background characteristics and exposure to components of the intervention. Background, intervention, and outcome variables were organized around the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior. In addition to the outcomes related to weight, hemoglobin A1 Thirteen percent of participants (N = 53 of 404) achieved a 5% weight reduction. Overall, the sample was primarily non-Hispanic (96%), urban (83%), Black (58.4%), married (58.4%) and male (~80%). The mean age was 56 years. Common comorbidities associated with obesity were evident including diabetes (30.2%), hypertension (60.9%), and hyperlipidemia (54.0%). The average body mass index was ~35. All available data were collected from program entry to a designated stop date; therefore, participants had unequal and irregular data points. Participants were observed repeatedly over time with 51% having 10 or more observations. A little more than half of the participants were group attendees (~56%) rather than self-managed. The majority of the intervention exposures were group rather than individual or telephone visits with providers. C, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels were examined. Achieving a 5% weight reduction was significantly associated with age in years (OR 1.04), group attendance beyond the day of orientation (OR 6.61), attendance at the holiday eating class (OR 3.67), exposure over time (measured in weeks, OR 1.02), and the interaction between time and group (OR .97). Weight reduction in pounds was significantly associated with age, baseline body mass index, total number of group classes attended, and telephone contact with the registered nurse. Using repeated measures of weight, the trajectory of weight was significantly associated with gender, baseline body mass index, and exposure to the intervention over time. Examination of additional outcomes revealed that components of the intervention were associated with beneficial changes in hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. Further research is needed to more fully describe successful weight reducers and the identify best practices to convert unsuccessful weight reducers to successful ones.
Issue Date:
Jun-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/317651
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1080567285?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarvin, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-30T02:43:48Zen
dc.date.available2014-05-30T02:43:48Zen
dc.date.issued2012-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/317651en
dc.description.abstractThis descriptive, exploratory study examined longitudinal clinical data for variables associated with weight reduction among veterans enrolled in a weight reduction intervention, the MOVE! Program. Variables of interest included background characteristics and exposure to components of the intervention. Background, intervention, and outcome variables were organized around the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior. In addition to the outcomes related to weight, hemoglobin A1 Thirteen percent of participants (N = 53 of 404) achieved a 5% weight reduction. Overall, the sample was primarily non-Hispanic (96%), urban (83%), Black (58.4%), married (58.4%) and male (~80%). The mean age was 56 years. Common comorbidities associated with obesity were evident including diabetes (30.2%), hypertension (60.9%), and hyperlipidemia (54.0%). The average body mass index was ~35. All available data were collected from program entry to a designated stop date; therefore, participants had unequal and irregular data points. Participants were observed repeatedly over time with 51% having 10 or more observations. A little more than half of the participants were group attendees (~56%) rather than self-managed. The majority of the intervention exposures were group rather than individual or telephone visits with providers. C, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels were examined. Achieving a 5% weight reduction was significantly associated with age in years (OR 1.04), group attendance beyond the day of orientation (OR 6.61), attendance at the holiday eating class (OR 3.67), exposure over time (measured in weeks, OR 1.02), and the interaction between time and group (OR .97). Weight reduction in pounds was significantly associated with age, baseline body mass index, total number of group classes attended, and telephone contact with the registered nurse. Using repeated measures of weight, the trajectory of weight was significantly associated with gender, baseline body mass index, and exposure to the intervention over time. Examination of additional outcomes revealed that components of the intervention were associated with beneficial changes in hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. Further research is needed to more fully describe successful weight reducers and the identify best practices to convert unsuccessful weight reducers to successful ones.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1080567285?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectInteraction Model of Client Health Behavioren
dc.subjectMOVE! Programen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectRegressionen
dc.subjectRepeated Measuresen
dc.subjectWeight Reductionen
dc.titleA Tailored Intervention Program for Overweight and Obese Vetrans: Who Benefits and Whenen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.description.advisorMarion, Lucyen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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