Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/126
Title:
Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic adverse effects: Case studies and a literature review for clinicians.
Authors:
Foster, Adriana; Wang, Zixuan; Usman, Manzoor; Stirewalt, Edna; Buckley, Peter F.
Abstract:
There is a growing body of literature supporting the contribution of genetic variability to the mechanisms responsible for the adverse effects of antipsychotic medications particularly movement disorders and weight gain. Despite the current gap between research studies and the practical tools available to the clinician to identify such risks, it is hoped that in the foreseeable future, pharmacogenetics will become a critical aid to guide the development of personalized therapeutic regimes with fewer adverse effects. We provide a summary of two cases that are examples of using cytochrome P450 pharmacogenetics in an attempt to guide treatment in the context of recent literature concerning the role of pharmacogenetics in the manifestation of adverse effects of antipsychotic therapies. These examples and the review of recent literature on pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic adverse effects illustrate the potential for applying the principles of predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine to the therapy of psychotic disorders.
Citation:
Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2007 Dec; 3(6):965-973
Issue Date:
20-Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/126
PubMed ID:
19300635
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2656342
Type:
Journal Article
ISSN:
1176-6328
Appears in Collections:
Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Adrianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zixuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorUsman, Manzooren_US
dc.contributor.authorStirewalt, Ednaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Peter F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:24Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2007 Dec; 3(6):965-973en_US
dc.identifier.issn1176-6328en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19300635en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/126-
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing body of literature supporting the contribution of genetic variability to the mechanisms responsible for the adverse effects of antipsychotic medications particularly movement disorders and weight gain. Despite the current gap between research studies and the practical tools available to the clinician to identify such risks, it is hoped that in the foreseeable future, pharmacogenetics will become a critical aid to guide the development of personalized therapeutic regimes with fewer adverse effects. We provide a summary of two cases that are examples of using cytochrome P450 pharmacogenetics in an attempt to guide treatment in the context of recent literature concerning the role of pharmacogenetics in the manifestation of adverse effects of antipsychotic therapies. These examples and the review of recent literature on pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic adverse effects illustrate the potential for applying the principles of predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine to the therapy of psychotic disorders.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.titlePharmacogenetics of antipsychotic adverse effects: Case studies and a literature review for clinicians.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2656342en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Pathologyen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Psychiatry and Health Behavioren_US

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