Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/121
Title:
Blood lead level and risk of asthma.
Authors:
Joseph, Christine L.M.; Havstad, Suzanne L; Ownby, Dennis R; Peterson, Edward L; Maliarik, Mary; McCabe, Michael J; Barone, Charles; Johnson, Christine Cole ( 0000-0002-6864-6604 )
Abstract:
Asthma and lead poisoning are prevalent among urban children in the United States. Lead exposure may be associated with excessive production of immunoglobulin E, possibly increasing asthma risk and contributing to racial disparities. The objective of this study was to examine racial differences in the association of blood lead level (BLL) to risk of developing asthma. We established and followed a cohort prospectively to determine asthma onset, using patient encounters and drug claims obtained from hospital databases. Participants were managed care enrollees with BLL measured and documented at 1-3 years of age. We used multiple variable analysis techniques to determine the relationship of BLL to period prevalent and incident asthma. Of the 4,634 children screened for lead from 1995 through 1998, 69.5% were African American, 50.5% were male, and mean age was 1.2 years. Among African Americans, BLL > or = 5 and BLL > or = 10 microg/dL were not associated with asthma. The association of BLL > or = 5 microg/dL with asthma among Caucasians was slightly elevated, but not significant [adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) = 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-2.9; p = 0.40]. Despite the small number of Caucasians with high BLL, the adjHR increased to 2.7 (95% CI, 0.9-8.1; p = 0.09) when more stringent criteria for asthma were used. When compared with Caucasians with BLL < 5 microg/dL, African Americans were at a significantly increased risk of asthma regardless of BLL (adjHR = 1.4-3.0). We conclude that an effect of BLL on risk of asthma for African Americans was not observed. These results demonstrate the need for further exploration of the complex interrelationships between race, asthma phenotype, genetic susceptibilities, and socioenvironmental exposures, including lead.
Citation:
Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Jul 3; 113(7):900-904
Issue Date:
8-Jul-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/121
PubMed ID:
16002380
PubMed Central ID:
PMC1257653
Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
ISSN:
0091-6765
Appears in Collections:
Department of Pediatrics: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Christine L.M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHavstad, Suzanne Len_US
dc.contributor.authorOwnby, Dennis Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Edward Len_US
dc.contributor.authorMaliarik, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Michael Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarone, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Christine Coleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2005-07-08en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnviron Health Perspect. 2005 Jul 3; 113(7):900-904en_US
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16002380en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/121-
dc.description.abstractAsthma and lead poisoning are prevalent among urban children in the United States. Lead exposure may be associated with excessive production of immunoglobulin E, possibly increasing asthma risk and contributing to racial disparities. The objective of this study was to examine racial differences in the association of blood lead level (BLL) to risk of developing asthma. We established and followed a cohort prospectively to determine asthma onset, using patient encounters and drug claims obtained from hospital databases. Participants were managed care enrollees with BLL measured and documented at 1-3 years of age. We used multiple variable analysis techniques to determine the relationship of BLL to period prevalent and incident asthma. Of the 4,634 children screened for lead from 1995 through 1998, 69.5% were African American, 50.5% were male, and mean age was 1.2 years. Among African Americans, BLL > or = 5 and BLL > or = 10 microg/dL were not associated with asthma. The association of BLL > or = 5 microg/dL with asthma among Caucasians was slightly elevated, but not significant [adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) = 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-2.9; p = 0.40]. Despite the small number of Caucasians with high BLL, the adjHR increased to 2.7 (95% CI, 0.9-8.1; p = 0.09) when more stringent criteria for asthma were used. When compared with Caucasians with BLL < 5 microg/dL, African Americans were at a significantly increased risk of asthma regardless of BLL (adjHR = 1.4-3.0). We conclude that an effect of BLL on risk of asthma for African Americans was not observed. These results demonstrate the need for further exploration of the complex interrelationships between race, asthma phenotype, genetic susceptibilities, and socioenvironmental exposures, including lead.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subject.meshAsthma / epidemiology / ethnology / etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants / blooden_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLead / blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMichigan / epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUrban Healthen_US
dc.titleBlood lead level and risk of asthma.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.typeResearch Support, N.I.H., Extramuralen_US
dc.typeResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.en_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1257653en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Pediatricsen_US

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