Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/102
Title:
Male accessory gland protein reduces egg laying in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.
Authors:
Koene, Joris M; Sloot, Wiebe; Montagne-Wajer, Kora; Cummins, Scott F ( 0000-0002-1454-2076 ) ; Degnan, Bernard M; Smith, John S; Nagle, Gregg T; ter Maat, Andries
Abstract:
Seminal fluid is an important part of the ejaculate of internally fertilizing animals. This fluid contains substances that nourish and activate sperm for successful fertilization. Additionally, it contains components that influence female physiology to further enhance fertilization success of the sperm donor, possibly beyond the recipient's optimum. Although evidence for such substances abounds, few studies have unraveled their identities, and focus has been exclusively on separate-sex species. We present the first detailed study into the seminal fluid composition of a hermaphrodite (Lymnaea stagnalis). Eight novel peptides and proteins were identified from the seminal-fluid-producing prostate gland and tested for effects on oviposition, hatching and consumption. The gene for the protein found to suppress egg mass production, Ovipostatin, was sequenced, thereby providing the first fully-characterized seminal fluid substance in a simultaneous hermaphrodite. Thus, seminal fluid peptides and proteins have evolved and can play a crucial role in sexual selection even when the sexes are combined.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2010 Apr 12; 5(4):e10117
Issue Date:
20-Apr-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/102
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0010117
PubMed ID:
20404934
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2853560
Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKoene, Joris Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSloot, Wiebeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMontagne-Wajer, Koraen_US
dc.contributor.authorCummins, Scott Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorDegnan, Bernard Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, John Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorNagle, Gregg Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorter Maat, Andriesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-04-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2010 Apr 12; 5(4):e10117en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20404934en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0010117en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/102-
dc.description.abstractSeminal fluid is an important part of the ejaculate of internally fertilizing animals. This fluid contains substances that nourish and activate sperm for successful fertilization. Additionally, it contains components that influence female physiology to further enhance fertilization success of the sperm donor, possibly beyond the recipient's optimum. Although evidence for such substances abounds, few studies have unraveled their identities, and focus has been exclusively on separate-sex species. We present the first detailed study into the seminal fluid composition of a hermaphrodite (Lymnaea stagnalis). Eight novel peptides and proteins were identified from the seminal-fluid-producing prostate gland and tested for effects on oviposition, hatching and consumption. The gene for the protein found to suppress egg mass production, Ovipostatin, was sequenced, thereby providing the first fully-characterized seminal fluid substance in a simultaneous hermaphrodite. Thus, seminal fluid peptides and proteins have evolved and can play a crucial role in sexual selection even when the sexes are combined.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.titleMale accessory gland protein reduces egg laying in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2853560en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Cellular Biology and Anatomyen_US

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