Welcome to Scholarly Commons, the institutional repository for Augusta University.

 

 

The University Libraries offer advisory support to faculty who want to create open access journal publications or have questions regarding copyright, author rights, and publisher contracts.  Individuals may submit scholarly works or departments may submit a collection of works. Additional information about Scholarly Commons can be found on this Research Guide.

  • The effect of dentin desensitizers on the retention of full crowns cemented with a variety of luting/bonding agents

    Yim, Nantiya Harnkul; Department of Oral Biology (Augusta University, 1999-04-21)
  • Structural and functional aspects of organic cation transporters

    Wu, Xiang; Medical College of Georgia (Augusta University, 1999-07)
  • Confidence interval estimation for a binomial proportion when no successes are observed

    Wimmer, Courtney; Dias, James; Medical College of Georgia (Augusta University, 2009-04)
    Confidence interval estimation for a binomial proportion is a long debated topic, resulting in a wide range of exact and approximate methods. Many of these methods perform quite poorly when the number of observed successes in a sample of size n is zero. In this case, the main objective of the investigator is usually to obtain an upper bound, i.e., the upper limit of a onesided confidence interval. Traditional notions of expected interval length and coverage probability are not applicable in this situation. In this paper we use observed interval length and p-confidence to evaluate nine confidence interval methods for a binomial proportion. We also consider approximate sample sizes needed to achieve various upper bounds near the zero boundary. We show that many popular approximation methods perform poorly based on these criteria and conclude that the-exact method has superior performance in terms of interval length and p-confidence.
  • A Variable prenatal stress paradigm as a valid drug discovery platform for cognitive deficits associatied with neuropsychiatric disorders

    Wilson, Christina Ann; Medical College of Georgia (Augusta University, 2012-10)
    Cognitive dysfunction is now recognized to be central to the functional disability of several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, treatment options for the management of cognitive symptoms are limited and the development of novel therapeutics has been made difficult by the lack of appropriate animal models. It has been suggested that variable prenatal stress (PNS) in rodents might be an etiologically appropriate model for some components of schizophrenia. Thus, the overall goal of this dissertation project was to conduct a comprehensive behavioral study of the model to assess face validity, and to make a preliminary assessment of its construct and predictive validity. Our results indicate that exposure to PNS results in elevated corticosterone levels following exposure to acute stress, increased aggressive behaviors, as well as increased locomotor activity and stereotypic behaviors. Further, PNS rats had altered innate fear responses to predator odor as well as impaired fear extinction. Additionally, PNS in rats was associated with impairments of sustained attention, inhibitory response control, and recognition memory all of which could be attenuated by the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine. Collectivity, these data ,support the premise that PNS in rodents is a valid model system for studying some behavioral components of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as their treatment.

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