Welcome to Scholarly Commons, the institutional repository for Augusta University.

 

 

The University Libraries offer advisory support to faculty who want to create open access journal publications or have questions regarding copyright, author rights, and publisher contracts.  Individuals may submit scholarly works or departments may submit a collection of works. Additional information about Scholarly Commons can be found on this Research Guide.

  • CURS Connection January 2022

    Davis, Quentin; Knapp, Melissa; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship (Augusta University, 2022-01)
    Table of Contents: Undergraduate Research and Fine Arts Conference Expands; Students: Want to be a Summer Scholar?; CURS Student Research Seminar; Undergraduate Research Fellowships; Spring Grants; Saying Farewell to Melissa Knapp; Upcoming Events; Research Distinction Awardees.
  • CURS Connection November 2021

    Davis, Quentin; Knapp, Melissa; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship (Augusta University, 2021-11)
    Table of Contents: Chalk on the Walk; Undergraduate Research Fair; November Student Research Seminar (SRS); DIstinction in Research; Summer Scholars Program 2022; Mark Your Calendars; CURS Fellowships.
  • CURS Connection September 2021

    Davis, Quentin; Knapp, Melissa; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship (Augusta University, 2021-09)
    Table of Contents: CURS Student Spotlight - Palak Patel, CURS Student Fellow; Researcher Tool Kit Series; Undergraduate Research Fair; Student Research Series; Trainings and Presentation Opportunities; Student's "Green" Research Showcased Nationally; High Five My Faculty; Seeking CURS Ambassadors.
  • CURS Connection August 2021

    Davis, Quentin; Knapp, Melissa; Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship (Augusta University, 2021-08)
    Table of Contents: Ice Cream Social; Summer Scholars Program 2021; Researcher Tool Kit; Student Research Series; Seeking Speakers for the Fall 2021 Series; CURS Student Research Series; Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference; Fall CURS Grants; Chemical and Lab Safety Training.
  • EFFECTS OF SODIUM BICARBONATE ON GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS AND BLOOD PRESSURE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Mannon, Elinor; Department of Philosophy (Augusta University, 2021-10)
    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a therapeutic used in chronic kidney disease (CKD). NaHCO3 is typically used to treat metabolic acidosis, but clinical studies have indicated that NaHCO3 supplementation may slow CKD progression. As such, NaHCO3 is now given to patients with CKD to slow the decline of glomerular filtration rate. However, the consequences of chronic NaHCO3 supplementation in CKD remain unclear. Acidosis has been associated with insulin resistance, and correction of acidosis with NaHCO3 was reported to improve insulin sensitivity. Our goal in Aim 1 was to determine whether acid and alkali loading would promote loss of acid-base homeostasis and consequently decrease insulin sensitivity. We determined that the blood glucose response to insulin is enhanced following renal mass reduction, and that this response is not reversed by an acidosis. Additionally, the development of an alkalosis did not impair the blood glucose response to insulin. Alkali can promote potassium (K+) wasting, and an association between K+ wasting and insulin resistance has been identified in clinical and basic science research. Our goal in Aim 2 was to identify whether chronic NaHCO3 treatment may promote loss of insulin sensitivity through effects on K+ status. We determined that chronic NaHCO3 treatment impairs insulin sensitivity when combined with other K+ wasting stimuli. K+ deprivation alone also impaired the blood glucose response to insulin, however these impairments in insulin sensitivity were not directly related to decreases in intracellular [K+]. Salt-sensitivity increases as functional renal mass declines, and chronic sodium (Na+) loading with NaHCO3 may contribute to hypertension in patients with CKD. Our goal in Aim 3 was to investigate whether NaHCO3 loading promotes similar levels of Na+ and volume retention, and hypertension as sodium chloride (NaCl) loading does in a rat model of CKD. We found that NaHCO3 was pro-hypertensive, but to a lesser degree than NaCl, despite similar amounts of Na+ and volume retention. From these studies we concluded that NaHCO3 does not improve insulin sensitivity through its effects on acid-base status. Further, access to dietary K+ may improve insulin sensitivity with chronic NaHCO3 treatment. Finally, NaHCO3 can promote hypertension in CKD.

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