Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Young Black Girls: Relations to Body Fatness and Aerobic Fitness, and Effects of a Randomized Physical Activity Trial

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/759
Title:
Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Young Black Girls: Relations to Body Fatness and Aerobic Fitness, and Effects of a Randomized Physical Activity Trial
Authors:
Gutin, Bernard; Harris, Ryan A.; Howe, Cheryl A. ( 0000-0001-5321-1918 ) ; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Zhu, Haidong; Dong, Yanbin
Abstract:
There is little evidence from randomized trials showing that physical activity alone influences biomarker profiles in youths. This study tested two hypotheses: (i) that elevated body fatness and poor fitness would be associated with unfavorable levels of cardiometabolic biomarkers in 8- 12-y-old black girls (n = 242) and (ii) that a 10-mo PA intervention would have favorable effects on the fatness-related cardiometabolic biomarkers. At baseline, all fatness indices (i.e., percent body fat, visceral adipose tissue, BMI, and waist circumference) were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with unfavorable levels of insulin, glucose, systolic BP, diastolic BP, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Aerobic fitness was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with favorable levels of insulin, CRP, fibrinogen, and HDL2. The PA intervention had significant and favorable effects on fitness, fatness, and two biomarkersâ resting heart rate and LDL cholesterol. More research is needed to clarify what types of interventions can enhance the cardiometabolic health of youths.
Citation:
Int J Pediatr. 2011 Oct 11; 2011:219268
Issue Date:
11-Oct-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/759
DOI:
10.1155/2011/219268
PubMed ID:
22007244
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3191769
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1687-9759
Appears in Collections:
Georgia Prevention Center: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGutin, Bernarden_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Ryan A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Cheryl A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Maribeth H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Haidongen_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Yanbinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T20:30:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T20:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationInt J Pediatr. 2011 Oct 11; 2011:219268en_US
dc.identifier.issn1687-9759en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22007244en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2011/219268en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/759-
dc.description.abstractThere is little evidence from randomized trials showing that physical activity alone influences biomarker profiles in youths. This study tested two hypotheses: (i) that elevated body fatness and poor fitness would be associated with unfavorable levels of cardiometabolic biomarkers in 8- 12-y-old black girls (n = 242) and (ii) that a 10-mo PA intervention would have favorable effects on the fatness-related cardiometabolic biomarkers. At baseline, all fatness indices (i.e., percent body fat, visceral adipose tissue, BMI, and waist circumference) were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with unfavorable levels of insulin, glucose, systolic BP, diastolic BP, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Aerobic fitness was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with favorable levels of insulin, CRP, fibrinogen, and HDL2. The PA intervention had significant and favorable effects on fitness, fatness, and two biomarkersâ resting heart rate and LDL cholesterol. More research is needed to clarify what types of interventions can enhance the cardiometabolic health of youths.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2011 Bernard Gutin et al.en_US
dc.subjectClinical Studyen_US
dc.titleCardiometabolic Biomarkers in Young Black Girls: Relations to Body Fatness and Aerobic Fitness, and Effects of a Randomized Physical Activity Trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3191769en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameGeorgia Institute for Prevention of Human Diseases and Accidents-
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Pediatrics-
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Biostatistics and Epidemiology-

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