The Combination of Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein Predicts the Outcomes of Chinese Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Vascular Parkinsonism

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/737
Title:
The Combination of Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein Predicts the Outcomes of Chinese Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Vascular Parkinsonism
Authors:
Zhang, Limin; Yan, Junqiang; Xu, Yunqi; Long, Ling; Zhu, Cansheng; Chen, Xiaohong; Jiang, Ying; Yang, Lijuan; Bian, Lianfang; Wang, Qing
Abstract:
Background: The elevation of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP) has been correlated to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) or vascular diseases. The association and clinical relevance of a combined assessment of Hcy and CRP levels in patients with PD and vascular parkinsonism (VP) are unknown.; Methodology/Principal Findings: We performed a cross-sectional study of 88 Chinese patients with PD and VP using a clinical interview and the measurement of plasma Hcy and CRP to determine if Hcy and CRP levels in patients may predict the outcomes of the motor status, non-motor symptoms (NMS), disease severity, and cognitive declines. Each patient’s NMS, cognitive deficit, disease severity, and motor status were assessed by the Nonmotor Symptoms Scale (NMSS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale (H&Y), and the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale part III (UPDRS III), respectively. We found that 100% of patients with PD and VP presented with NMS. The UPDRS III significantly correlated with CRP (P = 0.011) and NMSS (P = 0.042) in PD patients. The H&Y was also correlated with Hcy (P = 0.002), CRP (P = 0.000), and NMSS (P = 0.023) in PD patients. In VP patients, the UPDRS III and H&Y were not significantly associated with NMSS, Hcy, CRP, or MMSE. Strong correlations were observed between Hcy and NMSS as well as between CRP and NMSS in PD and VP.; Conclusions/Significance: Our findings support the hypothesis that Hcy and CRP play important roles in the pathogenesis of PD. The combination of Hcy and CRP may be used to assess the progression of PD and VP. Whether or not anti-inflammatory medication could be used in the management of PD and VP will produce an interesting topic for further research.
Editors:
Tsien, Joe Z.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2011 Apr 27; 6(4):e19333
Issue Date:
27-Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/737
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0019333
PubMed ID:
21556377
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3083436
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Neurology: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Liminen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, Junqiangen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yunqien_US
dc.contributor.authorLong, Lingen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Canshengen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xiaohongen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Yingen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Lijuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBian, Lianfangen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qingen_US
dc.contributor.editorTsien, Joe Z.-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T20:27:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T20:27:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-27en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2011 Apr 27; 6(4):e19333en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21556377en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0019333en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/737-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The elevation of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP) has been correlated to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) or vascular diseases. The association and clinical relevance of a combined assessment of Hcy and CRP levels in patients with PD and vascular parkinsonism (VP) are unknown.en_US
dc.description.abstractMethodology/Principal Findings: We performed a cross-sectional study of 88 Chinese patients with PD and VP using a clinical interview and the measurement of plasma Hcy and CRP to determine if Hcy and CRP levels in patients may predict the outcomes of the motor status, non-motor symptoms (NMS), disease severity, and cognitive declines. Each patient’s NMS, cognitive deficit, disease severity, and motor status were assessed by the Nonmotor Symptoms Scale (NMSS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale (H&Y), and the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale part III (UPDRS III), respectively. We found that 100% of patients with PD and VP presented with NMS. The UPDRS III significantly correlated with CRP (P = 0.011) and NMSS (P = 0.042) in PD patients. The H&Y was also correlated with Hcy (P = 0.002), CRP (P = 0.000), and NMSS (P = 0.023) in PD patients. In VP patients, the UPDRS III and H&Y were not significantly associated with NMSS, Hcy, CRP, or MMSE. Strong correlations were observed between Hcy and NMSS as well as between CRP and NMSS in PD and VP.en_US
dc.description.abstractConclusions/Significance: Our findings support the hypothesis that Hcy and CRP play important roles in the pathogenesis of PD. The combination of Hcy and CRP may be used to assess the progression of PD and VP. Whether or not anti-inflammatory medication could be used in the management of PD and VP will produce an interesting topic for further research.en_US
dc.rightsZhang et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectPsychiatryen_US
dc.subjectNeurologyen_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectVascular Dementiaen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Neurologyen_US
dc.subjectParkinson Diseaseen_US
dc.titleThe Combination of Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein Predicts the Outcomes of Chinese Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Vascular Parkinsonismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3083436en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology-

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