The Functional Upregulation of Piriform Cortex Is Associated with Cross-Modal Plasticity in Loss of Whisker Tactile Inputs

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/727
Title:
The Functional Upregulation of Piriform Cortex Is Associated with Cross-Modal Plasticity in Loss of Whisker Tactile Inputs
Authors:
Ye, Bing; Huang, Li; Gao, Zilong; Chen, Ping; Ni, Hong; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui
Abstract:
Background: Cross-modal plasticity is characterized as the hypersensitivity of remaining modalities after a sensory function is lost in rodents, which ensures their awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain unclear. We aim to study the role of different types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity.; Methodology/Principal Findings: In addition to behavioral tasks in mice, whole-cell recordings at the excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and their two-photon imaging, were conducted in piriform cortex. We produced a mouse model of cross-modal sensory plasticity that olfactory function was upregulated by trimming whiskers to deprive their sensory inputs. In the meantime of olfactory hypersensitivity, pyramidal neurons and excitatory synapses were functionally upregulated, as well as GABAergic cells and inhibitory synapses were downregulated in piriform cortex from the mice of cross-modal sensory plasticity, compared with controls. A crosswire connection between barrel cortex and piriform cortex was established in cross-modal plasticity.; Conclusion/Significance: An upregulation of pyramidal neurons and a downregulation of GABAergic neurons strengthen the activities of neuronal networks in piriform cortex, which may be responsible for olfactory hypersensitivity after a loss of whisker tactile input. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic strategies to promote sensory recovery and substitution.
Editors:
Mei, Lin
Citation:
PLoS One. 2012 Aug 21; 7(8):e41986
Issue Date:
21-Aug-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/727
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0041986
PubMed ID:
22927919
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3424151
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Neurology: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYe, Bingen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Lien_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Zilongen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Pingen_US
dc.contributor.authorNi, Hongen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Sudongen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Yanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jin-Huien_US
dc.contributor.editorMei, Lin-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:40:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:40:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-21en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2012 Aug 21; 7(8):e41986en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22927919en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0041986en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/727-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cross-modal plasticity is characterized as the hypersensitivity of remaining modalities after a sensory function is lost in rodents, which ensures their awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain unclear. We aim to study the role of different types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity.en_US
dc.description.abstractMethodology/Principal Findings: In addition to behavioral tasks in mice, whole-cell recordings at the excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and their two-photon imaging, were conducted in piriform cortex. We produced a mouse model of cross-modal sensory plasticity that olfactory function was upregulated by trimming whiskers to deprive their sensory inputs. In the meantime of olfactory hypersensitivity, pyramidal neurons and excitatory synapses were functionally upregulated, as well as GABAergic cells and inhibitory synapses were downregulated in piriform cortex from the mice of cross-modal sensory plasticity, compared with controls. A crosswire connection between barrel cortex and piriform cortex was established in cross-modal plasticity.en_US
dc.description.abstractConclusion/Significance: An upregulation of pyramidal neurons and a downregulation of GABAergic neurons strengthen the activities of neuronal networks in piriform cortex, which may be responsible for olfactory hypersensitivity after a loss of whisker tactile input. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic strategies to promote sensory recovery and substitution.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurological Systemen_US
dc.subjectSensory Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectComputational Biologyen_US
dc.subjectComputational Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectSensory Systemsen_US
dc.subjectModel Organismsen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Modelsen_US
dc.subjectMouseen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectComputational Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectSensory Systemsen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectCellular Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeurophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectSensory Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurological Systemen_US
dc.subjectSensory Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectMental Healthen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.titleThe Functional Upregulation of Piriform Cortex Is Associated with Cross-Modal Plasticity in Loss of Whisker Tactile Inputsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3424151en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology-

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