The Effects of Mechanical Stress on the Growth, Differentiation, and Paracrine Factor Production of Cardiac Stem Cells

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/689
Title:
The Effects of Mechanical Stress on the Growth, Differentiation, and Paracrine Factor Production of Cardiac Stem Cells
Authors:
Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Masayuki; Ohshima, Mako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Ikenaga, Shigeru; Mikamo, Akihito; Udo, Koichi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Li, Tao-Sheng
Abstract:
Stem cell therapies have been clinically employed to repair the injured heart, and cardiac stem cells are thought to be one of the most potent stem cell candidates. The beating heart is characterized by dynamic mechanical stresses, which may have a significant impact on stem cell therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate how mechanical stress affects the growth and differentiation of cardiac stem cells and their release of paracrine factors. In this study, human cardiac stem cells were seeded in a silicon chamber and mechanical stress was then induced by cyclic stretch stimulation (60 cycles/min with 120% elongation). Cells grown in non-stretched silicon chambers were used as controls. Our result revealed that mechanical stretching significantly reduced the total number of surviving cells, decreased Ki-67-positive cells, and increased TUNEL-positive cells in the stretched group 24 hrs after stretching, as compared to the control group. Interestingly, mechanical stretching significantly increased the release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β as well as the angiogenic growth factors VEGF and bFGF from the cells in 12 hrs. Furthermore, mechanical stretching significantly reduced the percentage of c-kit-positive stem cells, but increased the expressions of cardiac troponin-I and smooth muscle actin in cells 3 days after stretching. Using a traditional stretching model, we demonstrated that mechanical stress suppressed the growth and proliferation of cardiac stem cells, enhanced their release of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors, and improved their myogenic differentiation. The development of this in vitro approach may help elucidate the complex mechanisms of stem cell therapy for heart failure.
Editors:
McNeil, Paul L.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2011 Dec 28; 6(12):e28890
Issue Date:
28-Dec-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/689
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0028890
PubMed ID:
22216136
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3247223
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy Faculty Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKurazumi, Hiroshien_US
dc.contributor.authorKubo, Masayukien_US
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, Makoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYamamoto, Yumien_US
dc.contributor.authorTakemoto, Yoshihiroen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Ryoen_US
dc.contributor.authorIkenaga, Shigeruen_US
dc.contributor.authorMikamo, Akihitoen_US
dc.contributor.authorUdo, Koichien_US
dc.contributor.authorHamano, Kimikazuen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Tao-Shengen_US
dc.contributor.editorMcNeil, Paul L.-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:29:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:29:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-28en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2011 Dec 28; 6(12):e28890en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22216136en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0028890en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/689-
dc.description.abstractStem cell therapies have been clinically employed to repair the injured heart, and cardiac stem cells are thought to be one of the most potent stem cell candidates. The beating heart is characterized by dynamic mechanical stresses, which may have a significant impact on stem cell therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate how mechanical stress affects the growth and differentiation of cardiac stem cells and their release of paracrine factors. In this study, human cardiac stem cells were seeded in a silicon chamber and mechanical stress was then induced by cyclic stretch stimulation (60 cycles/min with 120% elongation). Cells grown in non-stretched silicon chambers were used as controls. Our result revealed that mechanical stretching significantly reduced the total number of surviving cells, decreased Ki-67-positive cells, and increased TUNEL-positive cells in the stretched group 24 hrs after stretching, as compared to the control group. Interestingly, mechanical stretching significantly increased the release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β as well as the angiogenic growth factors VEGF and bFGF from the cells in 12 hrs. Furthermore, mechanical stretching significantly reduced the percentage of c-kit-positive stem cells, but increased the expressions of cardiac troponin-I and smooth muscle actin in cells 3 days after stretching. Using a traditional stretching model, we demonstrated that mechanical stress suppressed the growth and proliferation of cardiac stem cells, enhanced their release of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors, and improved their myogenic differentiation. The development of this in vitro approach may help elucidate the complex mechanisms of stem cell therapy for heart failure.en_US
dc.rightsKurazumi et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectImmune Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectCytokinesen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental Biologyen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Developmenten_US
dc.subjectCytokinesen_US
dc.subjectStem Cellsen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Cell Biologyen_US
dc.subjectCellular Typesen_US
dc.subjectStem Cellsen_US
dc.subjectSignal Transductionen_US
dc.subjectSignaling Cascadesen_US
dc.subjectStress Signaling Cascadeen_US
dc.subjectCell Deathen_US
dc.subjectCellular Stress Responsesen_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectTribologyen_US
dc.subjectDamage Mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectMechanical Stressen_US
dc.subjectMaterials Scienceen_US
dc.subjectTribologyen_US
dc.subjectDamage Mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectMechanical Stressen_US
dc.subject.meshApoptosisen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Divisionen_US
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_US
dc.subject.meshMyocardiumen_US
dc.subject.meshStem Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Mechanicalen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Mechanical Stress on the Growth, Differentiation, and Paracrine Factor Production of Cardiac Stem Cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3247223en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Cellular Biology and Anatomy-
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies-

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