Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/670
Title:
Modulation of Syndecan-1 Shedding after Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation
Authors:
Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.; Holcomb, John B.; Gonzalez, Ernest A.; Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Park, Pyong Woo; Wang, WeiWei; Zaske, Ana Maria; Menge, Tyler; Kozar, Rosemary A.
Abstract:
The early use of fresh frozen plasma as a resuscitative agent after hemorrhagic shock has been associated with improved survival, but the mechanism of protection is unknown. Hemorrhagic shock causes endothelial cell dysfunction and we hypothesized that fresh frozen plasma would restore endothelial integrity and reduce syndecan-1 shedding after hemorrhagic shock. A prospective, observational study in severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock demonstrated significantly elevated levels of syndecan-1 (554±93 ng/ml) after injury, which decreased with resuscitation (187±36 ng/ml) but was elevated compared to normal donors (27±1 ng/ml). Three pro-inflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, fractalkine, and interleukin-1β, negatively correlated while one anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, positively correlated with shed syndecan-1. These cytokines all play an important role in maintaining endothelial integrity. An in vitro model of endothelial injury then specifically examined endothelial permeability after treatment with fresh frozen plasma orlactated Ringers. Shock or endothelial injury disrupted junctional integrity and increased permeability, which was improved with fresh frozen plasma, but not lactated Ringers. Changes in endothelial cell permeability correlated with syndecan-1 shedding. These data suggest that plasma based resuscitation preserved endothelial syndecan-1 and maintained endothelial integrity, and may help to explain the protective effects of fresh frozen plasma after hemorrhagic shock.
Editors:
McNeil, Paul L.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2011 Aug 19; 6(8):e23530
Issue Date:
19-Aug-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/670
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0023530
PubMed ID:
21886795
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3158765
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy Faculty Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaywood-Watson, Ricky J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolcomb, John B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Ernest A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Zhanglongen_US
dc.contributor.authorPati, Shibanien_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Pyong Wooen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, WeiWeien_US
dc.contributor.authorZaske, Ana Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMenge, Tyleren_US
dc.contributor.authorKozar, Rosemary A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorMcNeil, Paul L.-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:29:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:29:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-19en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2011 Aug 19; 6(8):e23530en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21886795en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0023530en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/670-
dc.description.abstractThe early use of fresh frozen plasma as a resuscitative agent after hemorrhagic shock has been associated with improved survival, but the mechanism of protection is unknown. Hemorrhagic shock causes endothelial cell dysfunction and we hypothesized that fresh frozen plasma would restore endothelial integrity and reduce syndecan-1 shedding after hemorrhagic shock. A prospective, observational study in severely injured patients in hemorrhagic shock demonstrated significantly elevated levels of syndecan-1 (554±93 ng/ml) after injury, which decreased with resuscitation (187±36 ng/ml) but was elevated compared to normal donors (27±1 ng/ml). Three pro-inflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, fractalkine, and interleukin-1β, negatively correlated while one anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, positively correlated with shed syndecan-1. These cytokines all play an important role in maintaining endothelial integrity. An in vitro model of endothelial injury then specifically examined endothelial permeability after treatment with fresh frozen plasma orlactated Ringers. Shock or endothelial injury disrupted junctional integrity and increased permeability, which was improved with fresh frozen plasma, but not lactated Ringers. Changes in endothelial cell permeability correlated with syndecan-1 shedding. These data suggest that plasma based resuscitation preserved endothelial syndecan-1 and maintained endothelial integrity, and may help to explain the protective effects of fresh frozen plasma after hemorrhagic shock.en_US
dc.rightsHaywood-Watson et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectMolecular Cell Biologyen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectAnatomy and Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectImmune Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectCytokinesen_US
dc.subjectDiagnostic Medicineen_US
dc.subjectClinical Laboratory Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectTransfusion Medicineen_US
dc.subjectSurgeryen_US
dc.subjectTrauma Surgeryen_US
dc.titleModulation of Syndecan-1 Shedding after Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3158765en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Cellular Biology and Anatomy-
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies-

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