Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622128
Title:
EVALUATION OF CANIS HAIR AS A POTENTIAL WILD PIG REPELLENT ON COWDEN PLANTATION, JACKSON, SC
Authors:
Hitchens, Samantha Rae
Abstract:
Invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) continue to have a destructive impact across the world. The uncontrolled spread of these intrusive animals has affected many cultures, making it important to develop management methods across many locales. Wild pigs are often hunted with dogs; however, this method may not be suitable or legal in all areas impacted by this animal. In consideration of this fact, along with the knowledge that pigs have a highly developed sense of smell, led us to the hypothesis: Can a natural scent function as a satisfactory pig repellant? Based upon our past testing trials of potential scents in the Savannah River swamp near Jackson, SC, dog hair appeared to have a potential effect. We designed this experiment to attract wild pigs into an area baited with corn, and subsequently applied dog hair to the same area. Trail cameras were used at study locations to observe the normal patterns of wild pigs before and after dog hair applications. We analyzed our data by noting the presence and absence of pigs throughout our study trials. Image totals were also examined to determine if the dog hair dissuaded the pigs from entering the area. Our results supported our hypothesis.
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences; Hull College of Business
Issue Date:
13-Feb-2019
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622128
Type:
Poster Presentation
Description:
Presentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
Department of Business Administration: Student Research and Presentations; Department of Biological Sciences: Student Research and Presentations; 20th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHitchens, Samantha Raeen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T20:07:19Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-13T20:07:19Z-
dc.date.issued2019-02-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/622128-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 20th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractInvasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) continue to have a destructive impact across the world. The uncontrolled spread of these intrusive animals has affected many cultures, making it important to develop management methods across many locales. Wild pigs are often hunted with dogs; however, this method may not be suitable or legal in all areas impacted by this animal. In consideration of this fact, along with the knowledge that pigs have a highly developed sense of smell, led us to the hypothesis: Can a natural scent function as a satisfactory pig repellant? Based upon our past testing trials of potential scents in the Savannah River swamp near Jackson, SC, dog hair appeared to have a potential effect. We designed this experiment to attract wild pigs into an area baited with corn, and subsequently applied dog hair to the same area. Trail cameras were used at study locations to observe the normal patterns of wild pigs before and after dog hair applications. We analyzed our data by noting the presence and absence of pigs throughout our study trials. Image totals were also examined to determine if the dog hair dissuaded the pigs from entering the area. Our results supported our hypothesis.en
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen
dc.subjectwild pigen
dc.titleEVALUATION OF CANIS HAIR AS A POTENTIAL WILD PIG REPELLENT ON COWDEN PLANTATION, JACKSON, SCen
dc.typePoster Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.departmentHull College of Businessen
cr.funding.sourceAugusta University CURS Student Research Granten
dc.contributor.sponsorSaul, Bruceen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
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