Physiological Stress Levels on Cognitive Function

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621923
Title:
Physiological Stress Levels on Cognitive Function
Authors:
Quon, Jonathan
Abstract:
Regular exercise has been proven to reduce insulin resistance, increase blood flow, release neurotransmitters, and lead to many more health and cognitive benefits. However, studies investigating the immediate effects of a physical stress or on cognitive functioning are limited. In theory, cognitive reactions could speed up immediately following exercise due to enhanced nutrient delivery via increased blood flow, or cognitive reactions could slow down immediately after exercise due to physiological fatigue. These contradicting theories create much interest and concern for those who need to be functioning at their full cognitive potential. For instance, should college students who are studying for large periods of time take breaks to exercise, or would exercise be harmful to their mental functioning? The purpose of my project is to test how cognitive function is affected immediately following exercise. I predict that lower intensity aerobic exercise will boost mental performance, whereas high intensity anaerobic exercise will decrease mental performance.
Affiliation:
Department of Kinesiology
Issue Date:
19-Nov-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621923
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en_US
Series/Report no.:
Fall; 2017
Appears in Collections:
Honors Program Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuon, Jonathanen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-19T13:37:55Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-19T13:37:55Z-
dc.date.issued2018-11-19-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621923-
dc.description.abstractRegular exercise has been proven to reduce insulin resistance, increase blood flow, release neurotransmitters, and lead to many more health and cognitive benefits. However, studies investigating the immediate effects of a physical stress or on cognitive functioning are limited. In theory, cognitive reactions could speed up immediately following exercise due to enhanced nutrient delivery via increased blood flow, or cognitive reactions could slow down immediately after exercise due to physiological fatigue. These contradicting theories create much interest and concern for those who need to be functioning at their full cognitive potential. For instance, should college students who are studying for large periods of time take breaks to exercise, or would exercise be harmful to their mental functioning? The purpose of my project is to test how cognitive function is affected immediately following exercise. I predict that lower intensity aerobic exercise will boost mental performance, whereas high intensity anaerobic exercise will decrease mental performance.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFallen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2017en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.titlePhysiological Stress Levels on Cognitive Functionen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Kinesiologyen
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