Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621796
Title:
Community-based approaches to reduce chronic disease disparities in Georgia
Authors:
Rollins, Latrice; Akintobi, Tabia Henry; Hermstad, April; Cooper, Dexter; Goodin, Lisa; Beane, Jennifer; Spivey, Sedessie; Riedesel, Amy; Taylor, Olayiwola; Lyn, Rodney
Abstract:
Background: Among underserved and racial/ethnic minority populations in Georgia, there are profound health disparities and a burden of chronic diseases. Such diseases, which are preventable, are influenced by risk factors, including poor nutrition, physical inactivity, lack of quality health care, and tobacco use and exposure. Awardees of the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) and Partnerships to Improve Community Health (PICH) are implementing community-based initiatives using evidence-based, policy, systems, and environmental approaches to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities and the chronic disease burden in underserved urban and rural Georgia communities. Methods: Within the context of a social ecological framework, the REACH and PICH awardees selected interventions. Their impact in the areas of tobacco use and exposure, chronic disease prevention and management, and nutrition are described. Results: To date, the interventions of Georgia’s PICH and REACH awardees have reached approximately 805,000 Georgia residents. Conclusions: By implementing strategies for community-based policy, systems, and environmental improvement, Georgia’s PICH and REACH awardees are reducing tobacco use and exposure; increasing access to healthy foods; and providing chronic disease prevention, risk reduction, and management opportunities for underserved communities in urban and rural Georgia communities. Their efforts to address chronic disease risk factors at various social and ecological levels are contributing to a reduction in racial/ethnic health disparities and the chronic disease burden in Georgia.
Affiliation:
Morehouse, Dekalb County Board of Health, Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness, Tanner Medical Center, Georgia State University
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621796
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 6, Number 4 (2016)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRollins, Latriceen
dc.contributor.authorAkintobi, Tabia Henryen
dc.contributor.authorHermstad, Aprilen
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Dexteren
dc.contributor.authorGoodin, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorBeane, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorSpivey, Sedessieen
dc.contributor.authorRiedesel, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Olayiwolaen
dc.contributor.authorLyn, Rodneyen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-09T00:56:01Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-09T00:56:01Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621796-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Among underserved and racial/ethnic minority populations in Georgia, there are profound health disparities and a burden of chronic diseases. Such diseases, which are preventable, are influenced by risk factors, including poor nutrition, physical inactivity, lack of quality health care, and tobacco use and exposure. Awardees of the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) and Partnerships to Improve Community Health (PICH) are implementing community-based initiatives using evidence-based, policy, systems, and environmental approaches to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities and the chronic disease burden in underserved urban and rural Georgia communities. Methods: Within the context of a social ecological framework, the REACH and PICH awardees selected interventions. Their impact in the areas of tobacco use and exposure, chronic disease prevention and management, and nutrition are described. Results: To date, the interventions of Georgia’s PICH and REACH awardees have reached approximately 805,000 Georgia residents. Conclusions: By implementing strategies for community-based policy, systems, and environmental improvement, Georgia’s PICH and REACH awardees are reducing tobacco use and exposure; increasing access to healthy foods; and providing chronic disease prevention, risk reduction, and management opportunities for underserved communities in urban and rural Georgia communities. Their efforts to address chronic disease risk factors at various social and ecological levels are contributing to a reduction in racial/ethnic health disparities and the chronic disease burden in Georgia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.subjectcommunity based participatory researchen
dc.subjectcommunity healthen
dc.subjectcommunity clincal linkagesen
dc.subjecttobaccoen
dc.titleCommunity-based approaches to reduce chronic disease disparities in Georgiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMorehouse, Dekalb County Board of Health, Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness, Tanner Medical Center, Georgia State Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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