Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621757
Title:
Role of Perivascular Adipose Tissue in Vasoreactivity
Authors:
Prasad, Rosaria
Abstract:
Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) surrounds most systemic vessels directly around the lamina adventitia, which has an anti-atherosclerotic effect. However, inflamed and dysfunctional PVAT induced by high fat diet (HFD) is associated with various cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the systemic effect of PVAT on vascular functions in the setting of diet-induced obesity. 50 mg of PVAT or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SQAT, as a control) from obese donor mice (fed with HFD) was transplanted into the abdominal aorta in recipient mice. We found that PVAT transplantation group showed significantly higher insulin resistance than the SQ group (p=0.095) whereas no differences were observed in body weight, fat composition, and glucose tolerance between these groups. Interestingly, PVAT transplantation, but not SQAT or sham group, showed the impaired vasoconstriction in thoracic aorta, as examined by wire myography. Furthermore, PVAT transplanted group promoted endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by endothelium-dependent relaxation curve analysis.PVAT transplantation into the abdominal aorta is associated with endothelial dysfunction of the thoracic aorta. Dysfunction of PVAT induced by high-fat feeding may negatively affect metabolic and vasoreactivity in an endocrine manner.
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences
Issue Date:
12-Feb-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621757
Submitted date:
25-JAN-2018 01:42PM
Type:
Poster Presentation
Description:
Presentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
19th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrasad, Rosariaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-12T17:19:36Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-12T17:19:36Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-12-
dc.date.submitted25-JAN-2018 01:42PM-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621757-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractPerivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) surrounds most systemic vessels directly around the lamina adventitia, which has an anti-atherosclerotic effect. However, inflamed and dysfunctional PVAT induced by high fat diet (HFD) is associated with various cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the systemic effect of PVAT on vascular functions in the setting of diet-induced obesity. 50 mg of PVAT or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SQAT, as a control) from obese donor mice (fed with HFD) was transplanted into the abdominal aorta in recipient mice. We found that PVAT transplantation group showed significantly higher insulin resistance than the SQ group (p=0.095) whereas no differences were observed in body weight, fat composition, and glucose tolerance between these groups. Interestingly, PVAT transplantation, but not SQAT or sham group, showed the impaired vasoconstriction in thoracic aorta, as examined by wire myography. Furthermore, PVAT transplanted group promoted endothelial dysfunction as evaluated by endothelium-dependent relaxation curve analysis.PVAT transplantation into the abdominal aorta is associated with endothelial dysfunction of the thoracic aorta. Dysfunction of PVAT induced by high-fat feeding may negatively affect metabolic and vasoreactivity in an endocrine manner.en
dc.subjectPerivascular Adipose Tissue (PVAT)en
dc.subjectVasoreactivityen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.titleRole of Perivascular Adipose Tissue in Vasoreactivityen
dc.typePoster Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
cr.funding.sourceNational Institute of Health (R01)en
dc.contributor.sponsorKim, Ha Wonen
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Medicineen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
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