Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621324
Title:
The Effects of Physiological Stress Levels on Cognitive Performance
Authors:
Quon, Jonathan; Gaines, Hillary; Jules, Naomie; Holland, Maleah
Abstract:
Introduction: Challenging cognitive tests, such as academic exams, often fuel test anxiety which may compromise cognitive performance and result in lower test scores. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of a short moderate or vigorous aerobic exercise session (walking/running) on cognitive performance. Methods: 6 healthy male and female subjects, aged 18-30 years old, were equally and randomly divided into 3 groups: high intensity exercise (75% MaxHR), moderate intensity exercise (50% MaxHR), and rest (sat with concentration grid). A Random Test (reaction time measure), Memory Test (short-term memory and attention span measure), and Stroop Test (reaction time and attention span measure) were performed on the Card Sorting Box before and after the exercise intervention. The intervention lasted 10 minutes including a warm-up and cool-down. Results: No differences occurred between the 3 groups in pre- to post-intervention Card Sorting Box measures for the Random Test, Memory Test, or Stroop Test. However, a trend towards significance (p = 0.057) occurred for the % correct in the Memory Test when comparing pre- to post-intervention scores; vigorous intensity exercise demonstrated higher scores compared to moderate intensity exercise (p = 0.031) and sitting quietly to study (p =046). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that participating in short-duration vigorous and/ or moderate exercise or utilizing more traditional study techniques, such as sitting quietly to study, results in similar cognitive performance outcomes and therefore does not provide a significant cognitive benefit. However, due to small sample size, more participants are needed for conclusive findings.
Affiliation:
Department of Kinesiology and Health Sciences
Issue Date:
Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621324
Type:
Other
Language:
en_US
Description:
Poster presented at the 18th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
Department of Kinesiology: Student Research and Presentations; 18th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuon, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorGaines, Hillaryen
dc.contributor.authorJules, Naomieen
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Maleahen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-06T21:15:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-06T21:15:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621324-
dc.descriptionPoster presented at the 18th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Challenging cognitive tests, such as academic exams, often fuel test anxiety which may compromise cognitive performance and result in lower test scores. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of a short moderate or vigorous aerobic exercise session (walking/running) on cognitive performance. Methods: 6 healthy male and female subjects, aged 18-30 years old, were equally and randomly divided into 3 groups: high intensity exercise (75% MaxHR), moderate intensity exercise (50% MaxHR), and rest (sat with concentration grid). A Random Test (reaction time measure), Memory Test (short-term memory and attention span measure), and Stroop Test (reaction time and attention span measure) were performed on the Card Sorting Box before and after the exercise intervention. The intervention lasted 10 minutes including a warm-up and cool-down. Results: No differences occurred between the 3 groups in pre- to post-intervention Card Sorting Box measures for the Random Test, Memory Test, or Stroop Test. However, a trend towards significance (p = 0.057) occurred for the % correct in the Memory Test when comparing pre- to post-intervention scores; vigorous intensity exercise demonstrated higher scores compared to moderate intensity exercise (p = 0.031) and sitting quietly to study (p =046). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that participating in short-duration vigorous and/ or moderate exercise or utilizing more traditional study techniques, such as sitting quietly to study, results in similar cognitive performance outcomes and therefore does not provide a significant cognitive benefit. However, due to small sample size, more participants are needed for conclusive findings.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectCognitive Performanceen
dc.titleThe Effects of Physiological Stress Levels on Cognitive Performanceen_US
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Kinesiology and Health Sciencesen
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