Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621301
Title:
Correlation of Deph of Solvent Resistance with Monomer Conversion
Authors:
Keller, Elizabeth; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.
Abstract:
In the mouth, inadequately cured dental restorative materials may lead to detrimental consequences in their longevity. As light travels through these photo-curable restorative composites, there is an exponential decrease in light penetration with depth, and therefore the extent of local polymerization is compromised. This phenomenon is termed the “Depth of Cure” issue, which restricts the thickness if increment that each restorative material can be placed and polymerized. The purpose of this research is to develop an easily performed test that provides a correlational value between visually identifiable transition zones within acetone-sonicated, sectioned, cured composite specimens and the extent to which a composite has reached maximal monomer conversion values, to ultimately determine adequacy of polymerization at the depth of cure for certain restorative materials. This test method, proven to be independent of composite type, will be submitted to the working group associated with the revision of the International Organization for Standards Organization 4049 standard, for consideration of further testing and perhaps replacement of the current method. This research provides a fulfillment of the requests from well-respected dental clinicians to provide a clinically relevant and meaningful depth of cure test.
Affiliation:
Department of Restorative Sciences
Issue Date:
Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621301
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
Presentation given at the 18th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
Department of Restorative Sciences: Faculty Research and Presentations; 18th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Oral Symposia I

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeller, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorRueggeberg, Frederick A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-06T18:56:03Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-06T18:56:03Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621301-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 18th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractIn the mouth, inadequately cured dental restorative materials may lead to detrimental consequences in their longevity. As light travels through these photo-curable restorative composites, there is an exponential decrease in light penetration with depth, and therefore the extent of local polymerization is compromised. This phenomenon is termed the “Depth of Cure” issue, which restricts the thickness if increment that each restorative material can be placed and polymerized. The purpose of this research is to develop an easily performed test that provides a correlational value between visually identifiable transition zones within acetone-sonicated, sectioned, cured composite specimens and the extent to which a composite has reached maximal monomer conversion values, to ultimately determine adequacy of polymerization at the depth of cure for certain restorative materials. This test method, proven to be independent of composite type, will be submitted to the working group associated with the revision of the International Organization for Standards Organization 4049 standard, for consideration of further testing and perhaps replacement of the current method. This research provides a fulfillment of the requests from well-respected dental clinicians to provide a clinically relevant and meaningful depth of cure test.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDental Materialsen
dc.subjectMouthen
dc.subjectPolymerizationen
dc.subjectInternational Organization for Standards Organizationen
dc.titleCorrelation of Deph of Solvent Resistance with Monomer Conversionen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Restorative Sciencesen
All Items in Scholarly Commons are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.