Differential Regulation of the Variations Induced by Environmental Richness in Adult Neurogenesis as a Function of Time: A Dual Birthdating Analysis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/591
Title:
Differential Regulation of the Variations Induced by Environmental Richness in Adult Neurogenesis as a Function of Time: A Dual Birthdating Analysis
Authors:
Llorens-Martí­n, Marí­a; Tejeda, Gonzalo S.; Trejo, José L.
Abstract:
Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) augments after environmental enrichment (EE) and it has been related to some of the anxiolytic, antidepressant and neuroprotective effects of EE. Indeed, it has been suggested that EE specifically modulates hippocampal neurogenic cell populations over the course of time. Here we have used dual-birthdating to study two subpopulations of newborn neuron in mice (Mus musculus): those born at the beginning and at the end of enrichment. In this way, we demonstrate that while short-term cell survival is upregulated after an initial 1 week period of enrichment in 2 month old female mice, after long-term enrichment (2 months) neither cell proliferation nor the survival of the younger newly born cell populations are distinguishable from that observed in non-enriched control mice. In addition, we show that the survival of older newborn neurons alone (i.e. those born at the beginning of the enrichment) is higher than in controls, due to the significantly lower levels of cell death. Indeed, these parameters are rapidly adjusted to the sudden cessation of the EE conditions. These findings suggest both an early selective, long-lasting effect of EE on the neurons born in the initial stages of enrichment, and a quick response when the environment again becomes impoverished. Therefore, EE induces differential effects on distinct subpopulations of newborn neurons depending on the age of the immature cells and on the duration of the EE itself. The interaction of these two parameters constitutes a new, specific regulation of these neurogenic populations that might account for the long-term enrichment's behavioral effects.
Editors:
Tsien, Joe Z.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2010 Aug 16; 5(8):e12188
Issue Date:
16-Aug-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/591
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0012188
PubMed ID:
20808440
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2922333
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Neurology Faculty Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLlorens-Martí­n, Marí­aen_US
dc.contributor.authorTejeda, Gonzalo S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrejo, José L.en_US
dc.contributor.editorTsien, Joe Z.-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:26:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:26:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010-08-16en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2010 Aug 16; 5(8):e12188en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20808440en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0012188en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/591-
dc.description.abstractAdult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) augments after environmental enrichment (EE) and it has been related to some of the anxiolytic, antidepressant and neuroprotective effects of EE. Indeed, it has been suggested that EE specifically modulates hippocampal neurogenic cell populations over the course of time. Here we have used dual-birthdating to study two subpopulations of newborn neuron in mice (Mus musculus): those born at the beginning and at the end of enrichment. In this way, we demonstrate that while short-term cell survival is upregulated after an initial 1 week period of enrichment in 2 month old female mice, after long-term enrichment (2 months) neither cell proliferation nor the survival of the younger newly born cell populations are distinguishable from that observed in non-enriched control mice. In addition, we show that the survival of older newborn neurons alone (i.e. those born at the beginning of the enrichment) is higher than in controls, due to the significantly lower levels of cell death. Indeed, these parameters are rapidly adjusted to the sudden cessation of the EE conditions. These findings suggest both an early selective, long-lasting effect of EE on the neurons born in the initial stages of enrichment, and a quick response when the environment again becomes impoverished. Therefore, EE induces differential effects on distinct subpopulations of newborn neurons depending on the age of the immature cells and on the duration of the EE itself. The interaction of these two parameters constitutes a new, specific regulation of these neurogenic populations that might account for the long-term enrichment's behavioral effects.en_US
dc.rightsLlorens-Martin et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Behavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Neurobiology of Disease and Regenerationen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Neuronal and Glial Cell Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Counten_US
dc.subject.meshCell Deathen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferationen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Survivalen_US
dc.subject.meshDeoxyuridineen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHippocampusen_US
dc.subject.meshIdoxuridineen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurogenesisen_US
dc.subject.meshNeuronsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleDifferential Regulation of the Variations Induced by Environmental Richness in Adult Neurogenesis as a Function of Time: A Dual Birthdating Analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2922333en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology-

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