The Transcription Factor Cux1 Regulates Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/585
Title:
The Transcription Factor Cux1 Regulates Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons
Authors:
Li, Ning; Zhao, Chun-Tao; Wang, Ying; Yuan, Xiao-Bing
Abstract:
In the murine cerebral cortex, mammalian homologues of the Cux family transcription factors, Cux1 and Cux2, have been identified as restricted molecular markers for the upper layer (II-IV) pyramidal neurons. However, their functions in cortical development are largely unknown. Here we report that increasing the intracellular level of Cux1, but not Cux2, reduced the dendritic complexity of cultured cortical pyramidal neurons. Consistently, reducing the expression of Cux1 promoted the dendritic arborization in these pyramidal neurons. This effect required the existence of the DNA-binding domains, hence the transcriptional passive repression activity of Cux1. Analysis of downstream signals suggested that Cux1 regulates dendrite development primarily through suppressing the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1, and RhoA may mediate the regulation of dendritic complexity by Cux1 and p27. Thus, Cux1 functions as a negative regulator of dendritic complexity for cortical pyramidal neurons.
Editors:
Mei, Lin
Citation:
PLoS One. 2010 May 11; 5(5):e10596
Issue Date:
11-May-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/585
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0010596
PubMed ID:
20485671
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2868054
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Neurology: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ningen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Chun-Taoen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yingen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Xiao-Bingen_US
dc.contributor.editorMei, Lin-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:26:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:26:48Z-
dc.date.issued2010-05-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2010 May 11; 5(5):e10596en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20485671en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0010596en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/585-
dc.description.abstractIn the murine cerebral cortex, mammalian homologues of the Cux family transcription factors, Cux1 and Cux2, have been identified as restricted molecular markers for the upper layer (II-IV) pyramidal neurons. However, their functions in cortical development are largely unknown. Here we report that increasing the intracellular level of Cux1, but not Cux2, reduced the dendritic complexity of cultured cortical pyramidal neurons. Consistently, reducing the expression of Cux1 promoted the dendritic arborization in these pyramidal neurons. This effect required the existence of the DNA-binding domains, hence the transcriptional passive repression activity of Cux1. Analysis of downstream signals suggested that Cux1 regulates dendrite development primarily through suppressing the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1, and RhoA may mediate the regulation of dendritic complexity by Cux1 and p27. Thus, Cux1 functions as a negative regulator of dendritic complexity for cortical pyramidal neurons.en_US
dc.rightsLi et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectCell Biology/Morphogenesis and Cell Biologyen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental Biology/Developmental Molecular Mechanismsen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental Biology/Neurodevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Neurodevelopmenten_US
dc.titleThe Transcription Factor Cux1 Regulates Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neuronsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2868054en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology-
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies-

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