Social Transmission of Avoidance Behavior under Situational Change in Learned and Unlearned Rats

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/571
Title:
Social Transmission of Avoidance Behavior under Situational Change in Learned and Unlearned Rats
Authors:
Masuda, Akira; Aou, Shuji
Abstract:
Background: Rats receive information from other conspecifics by observation or other types of social interaction. Such social interaction may contribute to the effective adaptation to changes of environment such as situational switching. Learning to avoid dangerous places or objects rapidly occurs with even a single conditioning session, and the conditioned memory tends to be sustained over long periods. The avoidance is important for adaptation, but the details of the conditions under which the social transmission of avoidance is formed are unknown. We demonstrate that the previous experience of avoidance learning is important for the formation of behaviors for social transmission of avoidance and that the experienced rats adapt to a change of situation determined by the presence or absence of aversive stimuli. We systematically investigated social influence on avoidance behavior using a passive avoidance test in a light/dark two-compartment apparatus.; Methodology/Principal Findings: Rats were divided into two groups, one receiving foot shocks and another with no aversive experience in a dark compartment. Experienced and inexperienced rats were further divided into subjects and partners. In Experiment 1, each subject experienced (1) interaction with an experienced partner, (2) interaction with an inexperienced partner, or (3) no interaction. In Experiment 2, each subject experienced interaction with a partner that received a shock. The entering latency to a light compartment was measured. The avoidance behavior of experienced rats was inhibited by interaction with inexperienced or experienced partners in a safely-changed situation. The avoidance of experienced rats was reinstated in a dangerously-changed situation by interaction with shocked rats. In contrast, the inexperienced rats were not affected by any social circumstances.; Conclusions/Significance: These results suggest that transmitted information among rats can be updated under a situational change and that the previous experience is crucial for social enhancement and inhibition of avoidance behavior in rats.
Editors:
Tsien, Joe Z.
Citation:
PLoS One. 2009 Aug 27; 4(8):e6794
Issue Date:
27-Aug-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/571
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0006794
PubMed ID:
19710921
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2728840
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Department of Neurology: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMasuda, Akiraen_US
dc.contributor.authorAou, Shujien_US
dc.contributor.editorTsien, Joe Z.-
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T16:26:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T16:26:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-27en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2009 Aug 27; 4(8):e6794en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19710921en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0006794en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/571-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Rats receive information from other conspecifics by observation or other types of social interaction. Such social interaction may contribute to the effective adaptation to changes of environment such as situational switching. Learning to avoid dangerous places or objects rapidly occurs with even a single conditioning session, and the conditioned memory tends to be sustained over long periods. The avoidance is important for adaptation, but the details of the conditions under which the social transmission of avoidance is formed are unknown. We demonstrate that the previous experience of avoidance learning is important for the formation of behaviors for social transmission of avoidance and that the experienced rats adapt to a change of situation determined by the presence or absence of aversive stimuli. We systematically investigated social influence on avoidance behavior using a passive avoidance test in a light/dark two-compartment apparatus.en_US
dc.description.abstractMethodology/Principal Findings: Rats were divided into two groups, one receiving foot shocks and another with no aversive experience in a dark compartment. Experienced and inexperienced rats were further divided into subjects and partners. In Experiment 1, each subject experienced (1) interaction with an experienced partner, (2) interaction with an inexperienced partner, or (3) no interaction. In Experiment 2, each subject experienced interaction with a partner that received a shock. The entering latency to a light compartment was measured. The avoidance behavior of experienced rats was inhibited by interaction with inexperienced or experienced partners in a safely-changed situation. The avoidance of experienced rats was reinstated in a dangerously-changed situation by interaction with shocked rats. In contrast, the inexperienced rats were not affected by any social circumstances.en_US
dc.description.abstractConclusions/Significance: These results suggest that transmitted information among rats can be updated under a situational change and that the previous experience is crucial for social enhancement and inhibition of avoidance behavior in rats.en_US
dc.rightsMasuda, Aou. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectResearch Articleen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Animal Cognitionen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Behavioral Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Cognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectNeuroscience/Experimental Psychologyen_US
dc.titleSocial Transmission of Avoidance Behavior under Situational Change in Learned and Unlearned Ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2728840en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Neurology-
dc.contributor.corporatenameCollege of Graduate Studies-

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