Can novel Apo A-I polymorphisms be responsible for low HDL in South Asian immigrants?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/148
Title:
Can novel Apo A-I polymorphisms be responsible for low HDL in South Asian immigrants?
Authors:
Dodani, Sunita; Dong, Yanbin; Zhu, Haidong; George, Varghese
Abstract:
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the world. Even though its rates have decreased worldwide over the past 30 years, event rates are still high in South Asians. South Asians are known to have low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. The objective of this study was to identify Apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) polymorphisms, the main protein component of HDL and explore its association with low HDL levels in South Asians. A pilot study on 30 South Asians was conducted and 12-h fasting samples for C-reactive protein, total cholesterol, HDL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, Lipoprotein (a), Insulin, glucose levels, DNA extraction, and sequencing of Apo A-I gene were done. DNA sequencing revealed six novel Apo A-I single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in South Asians, one of which (rs 35293760, C938T) was significantly associated with low (<40 mg/dl) HDL levels (P = 0.004). The association was also seen with total cholesterol (P = 0.026) and LDL levels (P = 0.032). This pilot work has highlighted some of the gene-environment associations that could be responsible for low HDL and may be excess CAD in South Asians. Further larger studies are required to explore and uncover these associations that could be responsible for excess CAD risk in South Asians.
Citation:
Indian J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan-Apr; 14(1):9-15
Issue Date:
19-Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/148
DOI:
10.4103/0971-6866.42321
PubMed ID:
20300285
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2840779
Type:
Journal Article
ISSN:
0971-6866
Appears in Collections:
Department of Medicine Faculty: Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDodani, Sunitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Yanbinen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Haidongen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Vargheseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:27Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-19en_US
dc.identifier.citationIndian J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan-Apr; 14(1):9-15en_US
dc.identifier.issn0971-6866en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20300285en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/0971-6866.42321en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/148-
dc.description.abstractCoronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in the world. Even though its rates have decreased worldwide over the past 30 years, event rates are still high in South Asians. South Asians are known to have low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. The objective of this study was to identify Apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) polymorphisms, the main protein component of HDL and explore its association with low HDL levels in South Asians. A pilot study on 30 South Asians was conducted and 12-h fasting samples for C-reactive protein, total cholesterol, HDL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, Lipoprotein (a), Insulin, glucose levels, DNA extraction, and sequencing of Apo A-I gene were done. DNA sequencing revealed six novel Apo A-I single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in South Asians, one of which (rs 35293760, C938T) was significantly associated with low (<40 mg/dl) HDL levels (P = 0.004). The association was also seen with total cholesterol (P = 0.026) and LDL levels (P = 0.032). This pilot work has highlighted some of the gene-environment associations that could be responsible for low HDL and may be excess CAD in South Asians. Further larger studies are required to explore and uncover these associations that could be responsible for excess CAD risk in South Asians.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.titleCan novel Apo A-I polymorphisms be responsible for low HDL in South Asian immigrants?en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2840779en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Medicineen_US

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