Definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/118
Title:
Definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines.
Authors:
Kimura, Yasutoshi; Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Nimura, Yuji; Hirata, Koichi; Sekimoto, Miho; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Wada, Keita; Miura, Fumihiko; Yasuda, Hideki; Yamashita, Yuichi; Nagino, Masato; Hirota, Masahiko ( 0000-0001-7651-5375 ) ; Tanaka, Atsushi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Strasberg, Steven M; Gadacz, Thomas R
Abstract:
This article discusses the definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. Acute cholangitis and cholecystitis mostly originate from stones in the bile ducts and gallbladder. Acute cholecystitis also has other causes, such as ischemia; chemicals that enter biliary secretions; motility disorders associated with drugs; infections with microorganisms, protozoa, and parasites; collagen disease; and allergic reactions. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is associated with a recent operation, trauma, burns, multisystem organ failure, and parenteral nutrition. Factors associated with the onset of cholelithiasis include obesity, age, and drugs such as oral contraceptives. The reported mortality of less than 10% for acute cholecystitis gives an impression that it is not a fatal disease, except for the elderly and/or patients with acalculous disease. However, there are reports of high mortality for cholangitis, although the mortality differs greatly depending on the year of the report and the severity of the disease. Even reports published in and after the 1980s indicate high mortality, ranging from 10% to 30% in the patients, with multiorgan failure as a major cause of death. Because many of the reports on acute cholecystitis and cholangitis use different standards, comparisons are difficult. Variations in treatment and risk factors influencing the mortality rates indicate the necessity for standardized diagnostic, treatment, and severity assessment criteria.
Citation:
J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg. 2007 Jan 30; 14(1):15-26
Issue Date:
25-Jan-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/118
DOI:
10.1007/s00534-006-1152-y
PubMed ID:
17252293
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2784509
Type:
Journal Article; Practice Guideline; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
ISSN:
0944-1166
Appears in Collections:
Department of Surgery: Faculty Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKimura, Yasutoshien_US
dc.contributor.authorTakada, Tadahiroen_US
dc.contributor.authorKawarada, Yoshifumien_US
dc.contributor.authorNimura, Yujien_US
dc.contributor.authorHirata, Koichien_US
dc.contributor.authorSekimoto, Mihoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYoshida, Masahiroen_US
dc.contributor.authorMayumi, Toshihikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorWada, Keitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiura, Fumihikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorYasuda, Hidekien_US
dc.contributor.authorYamashita, Yuichien_US
dc.contributor.authorNagino, Masatoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHirota, Masahikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Atsushien_US
dc.contributor.authorTsuyuguchi, Toshioen_US
dc.contributor.authorStrasberg, Steven Men_US
dc.contributor.authorGadacz, Thomas Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2007-01-25en_US
dc.identifier.citationJ Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg. 2007 Jan 30; 14(1):15-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn0944-1166en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17252293en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00534-006-1152-yen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/118-
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses the definitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. Acute cholangitis and cholecystitis mostly originate from stones in the bile ducts and gallbladder. Acute cholecystitis also has other causes, such as ischemia; chemicals that enter biliary secretions; motility disorders associated with drugs; infections with microorganisms, protozoa, and parasites; collagen disease; and allergic reactions. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is associated with a recent operation, trauma, burns, multisystem organ failure, and parenteral nutrition. Factors associated with the onset of cholelithiasis include obesity, age, and drugs such as oral contraceptives. The reported mortality of less than 10% for acute cholecystitis gives an impression that it is not a fatal disease, except for the elderly and/or patients with acalculous disease. However, there are reports of high mortality for cholangitis, although the mortality differs greatly depending on the year of the report and the severity of the disease. Even reports published in and after the 1980s indicate high mortality, ranging from 10% to 30% in the patients, with multiorgan failure as a major cause of death. Because many of the reports on acute cholecystitis and cholangitis use different standards, comparisons are difficult. Variations in treatment and risk factors influencing the mortality rates indicate the necessity for standardized diagnostic, treatment, and severity assessment criteria.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.subject.meshAbdominal Pain / etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholangitis / diagnosis / epidemiology / etiology / physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholecystitis, Acute / diagnosis / epidemiology / etiology / physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholecystolithiasis / complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines as Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications / epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrenceen_US
dc.subject.meshTokyoen_US
dc.titleDefinitions, pathophysiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.typePractice Guidelineen_US
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2784509en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Surgeryen_US

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