Excess coronary artery disease risk in South Asian immigrants: can dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein explain increased risk?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/110
Title:
Excess coronary artery disease risk in South Asian immigrants: can dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein explain increased risk?
Authors:
Dodani, Sunita
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States (US), and South Asian immigrants (SAIs) have a higher risk of CAD compared to Caucasians. Traditional risk factors may not completely explain high risk, and some of the unknown risk factors need to be explored. This short review is mainly focused on the possible role of dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in causing CAD and presents an overview of available literature on dysfunctional HDL. DISCUSSION: The conventional risk factors, insulin resistance parameters, and metabolic syndrome, although important in predicting CAD risk, may not sufficiently predict risk in SAIs. HDL has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antithrombotic properties that contribute to its function as an antiatherogenic agent. Recent Caucasian studies have shown HDL is not only ineffective as an antioxidant but, paradoxically, appears to be prooxidant, and has been found to be associated with CAD. Several causes have been hypothesized for HDL to become dysfunctional, including Apo lipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) polymorphisms. New risk factors and markers like dysfunctional HDL and genetic polymorphisms may be associated with CAD. CONCLUSIONS: More research is required in SAIs to explore associations with CAD and to enhance early detection and prevention of CAD in this high risk group.
Citation:
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2008 Oct; 4(5):953-961
Issue Date:
2-Feb-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/110
PubMed ID:
19183743
PubMed Central ID:
PMC2605339
Type:
Journal Article; Review
ISSN:
1176-6344
Appears in Collections:
Department of Medicine Faculty: Research and Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDodani, Sunitaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-24T22:03:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-24T22:03:21Z-
dc.date.issued2009-02-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationVasc Health Risk Manag. 2008 Oct; 4(5):953-961en_US
dc.identifier.issn1176-6344en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19183743en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/110-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States (US), and South Asian immigrants (SAIs) have a higher risk of CAD compared to Caucasians. Traditional risk factors may not completely explain high risk, and some of the unknown risk factors need to be explored. This short review is mainly focused on the possible role of dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in causing CAD and presents an overview of available literature on dysfunctional HDL. DISCUSSION: The conventional risk factors, insulin resistance parameters, and metabolic syndrome, although important in predicting CAD risk, may not sufficiently predict risk in SAIs. HDL has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antithrombotic properties that contribute to its function as an antiatherogenic agent. Recent Caucasian studies have shown HDL is not only ineffective as an antioxidant but, paradoxically, appears to be prooxidant, and has been found to be associated with CAD. Several causes have been hypothesized for HDL to become dysfunctional, including Apo lipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) polymorphisms. New risk factors and markers like dysfunctional HDL and genetic polymorphisms may be associated with CAD. CONCLUSIONS: More research is required in SAIs to explore associations with CAD and to enhance early detection and prevention of CAD in this high risk group.en_US
dc.rightsThe PMC Open Access Subset is a relatively small part of the total collection of articles in PMC. Articles in the PMC Open Access Subset are still protected by copyright, but are made available under a Creative Commons or similar license that generally allows more liberal redistribution and reuse than a traditional copyrighted work. Please refer to the license statement in each article for specific terms of use. The license terms are not identical for all articles in this subset.en_US
dc.subject.meshApolipoprotein A-I / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsia / ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group / genetics / statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshCoronary Artery Disease / blood / ethnology / etiology / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDyslipidemias / blood / complications / ethnology / geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEmigrants and Immigrants / statistics & numerical dataen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInflammation Mediators / blooden_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance / ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLipoproteins, HDL / blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X / complications / ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited States / epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleExcess coronary artery disease risk in South Asian immigrants: can dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein explain increased risk?en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.typeReviewen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2605339en_US
dc.contributor.corporatenameDepartment of Medicineen_US

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